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Bats of Madagascar Print E-mail

ImageHello, I'm Amyot. My colleagues and I are very pleased to bring you this collection of calls and images of the Bats of Madagascar!

Although we now know what most Malagasy bats look and sound like, we still have very little idea of their way of life and of their conservation status. As a result bats are easily the least studied mammals in Madgascar. We hope this guide will help stimulate interest in the bats of Madagascar, before it's too late! 

We dedicate this work to the memory of our dear colleague Nicola Grimwood 

 

 


 
 

 

About Mampam
Fish of Bui National Park

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According to many authoritative atlases and maps, Bui National Park is already underwater! But the hydro electric dam first planned in the 1920s was not started until August 24th 2007.  Now work has begun on a controversial hydroelectric dam that will destroy the riverine habitat of the park. Many millions of $$ were spent on the environmental impact assessment, but fortunately a team of poachers wildlife staff and students produced a much better guide to the Fishes of Bui National Park

 
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The Butaan Project
The Butaan Project - Research
butaan3.jpgThe only obligate fruit-eaters among reptiles are three species of monitor lizard that live in the Philippines. Frugivorous vertebrates tend to be able to fly (almost all are bats and birds) and so these lizards have a unique ecological role as highly specialized and relatively immobile fruit eaters. Before this project started, the only studies of this unique giant and endangered lizard had involved killing the animals. We have developed a set of techniques that allow us to learn about these animals in a completely non-destructive way.
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