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How long do Monitors live? Print E-mail
Captive Care of Monitors
Extract from A Little Book of Monitor Lizards © D. Bennett 1995. Viper Press, UK

There are very few records of the longevity of monitor lizards in captivity (Flower 1925, 1937, Snider & Bowler 1992, Bennett 1994) and virtually none of their lifespan in the wild. The record appears to be held by the Taronga Zoo in Sydney, where a Komodo dragon was kept for 24.5 years. The animal was adult when acquired, and a total lifespan of about 50 years has been predicted for this species (Auffenberg 1981). The Tel Aviv University Zoo maintained an adult desert monitor for 17 years, and estimated its age at death as at least 25 years. Other large monitors lizards are recorded as surviving for 20 years or more in captivity. Unfortunately there is much less information available on the lifespan of the dwarf monitor lizards. A female spotted tree goanna kept at the Basel Zoo in Switzerland was still laying eggs after 20 years in captivity (Bennett 1994b). Of course, the reported figures tend to be exceptions rather than the norm but they do indicate that a life expectancy of at least a decade is not unreasonable and that many specimens of both large and small species can live for at east twice as long. Monitor lizards therefore, although they do not attain the great ages recorded for crocodilians and chelonians, are amongst the most long lived of the squamates. Considering that most species can attain sexual maturity within three years it can be seen that the reproductive potential of these animals is enormous and that females of the more prolific species may be able to produce more than 500 eggs in a lifetime.

 

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About Mampam
Fish of Bui National Park

syno-200.jpg

According to many authoritative atlases and maps, Bui National Park is already underwater! But the hydro electric dam first planned in the 1920s was not started until August 24th 2007.  Now work has begun on a controversial hydroelectric dam that will destroy the riverine habitat of the park. Many millions of $$ were spent on the environmental impact assessment, but fortunately a team of poachers wildlife staff and students produced a much better guide to the Fishes of Bui National Park

 
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The Butaan Project
The Butaan Project - Research
butaan3.jpgThe only obligate fruit-eaters among reptiles are three species of monitor lizard that live in the Philippines. Frugivorous vertebrates tend to be able to fly (almost all are bats and birds) and so these lizards have a unique ecological role as highly specialized and relatively immobile fruit eaters. Before this project started, the only studies of this unique giant and endangered lizard had involved killing the animals. We have developed a set of techniques that allow us to learn about these animals in a completely non-destructive way.
Read more...
 

 

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