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Varanus primordius Print E-mail
Varanus primordius is a very poorly known goanna that was previously considered a subspecies of V.acanthurus (Mertens 1942d, 1963, 1966). It is similar in appearance to V.storri but the spines on the tail are less well developed and there are fewer midbody scale rows; up to 66 in primordius and at least 70 in storri (Storr 1966). Blunt-nosed goanna

Varanus primordius   Mertens 1942

Varanus primordius is a very poorly known goanna that was previously considered a subspecies of V.acanthurus (Mertens 1942d, 1963, 1966). It is similar in appearance to V.storri but the spines on the tail are less well developed and there are fewer midbody scale rows; up to 66 in primordius and at least 70 in storri (Storr 1966). It is known only from the far north of the Northern Territory and possibly the adjacent parts of Queensland and Western Australia (Gow 1981; Cogger 1993; Storr 1980). It inhabits rocky areas where it shelters under rocks and in crevices. Other lizards account for the bulk of their diet, they are also known to eat orthopterans, lizards eggs and ants (Losos & Greene 1988; James et al 1992).
 
 

 

About Mampam
Bye Bye Butaan

 butaan1.jpg

Butaan start to visit fruiting trees before they are large enough to swallow the fruits. They make repeat journeys to trees, perhaps to reinforce memory of the position of the tree. If the youngster survives it may continue to use this tree for many decades. Fruiting trees like this are a vital resource for entire populations of butaan. Learn more >


 
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The Butaan Project
The Butaan Project - Background and History
butaan2.jpgThe butaan was first described to science in 1845 from a juvenile specimen collected by Hugh Cuming. It was labelled only "Philippines". It was named Varanus grayi.  No other specimens came to light for over 120 years. In the 1970s Walter Auffenberg found another specimen with a location in Luzon, established that its correct scientific name was Varanus olivaceus, and undertook a 22 month study of the species based in Bicol. His study revealed that butaan occupy a unique ecological niche and have a lifestyle quite unlike any other monitor lizard. Auffenberg used local hunters with dogs to catch the animals. Of 126 butaan caught during his study, 116 animals were killed.
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