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Varanus primordius Print E-mail
Varanus primordius is a very poorly known goanna that was previously considered a subspecies of V.acanthurus (Mertens 1942d, 1963, 1966). It is similar in appearance to V.storri but the spines on the tail are less well developed and there are fewer midbody scale rows; up to 66 in primordius and at least 70 in storri (Storr 1966). Blunt-nosed goanna

Varanus primordius   Mertens 1942

Varanus primordius is a very poorly known goanna that was previously considered a subspecies of V.acanthurus (Mertens 1942d, 1963, 1966). It is similar in appearance to V.storri but the spines on the tail are less well developed and there are fewer midbody scale rows; up to 66 in primordius and at least 70 in storri (Storr 1966). It is known only from the far north of the Northern Territory and possibly the adjacent parts of Queensland and Western Australia (Gow 1981; Cogger 1993; Storr 1980). It inhabits rocky areas where it shelters under rocks and in crevices. Other lizards account for the bulk of their diet, they are also known to eat orthopterans, lizards eggs and ants (Losos & Greene 1988; James et al 1992).
 
 

 

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Monitoring Individuals 1

butaan1.jpgButaan are so shy they frequently remain in a tree for more than a week after being frightened. A large male we rescued from a trap hid in a tree for 22 days before coming down!* . Most lizards do not appear traumatised by being caught and released by scientists, and resume normal activity very quickly. But we think that butaan, especially older individuals, may permanently alter their activity areas after such an encounter. Because the animals are so shy, and highly vulnerable to human disturbance, we have had to develop a range of techniques that allow us to learn about them with the absolute minimum of interference.

 

 

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