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Green group- Sustainability guide to monitor lizards Print E-mail

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The green species are widely available from captive bred sources; if you keep pairs of these animals you have a good chance of breeding them if you treat them right, and if you just want a pet you have the satisfaction of knowing that they have not been taken from the wild. 

 

Varanus acanthurus (all subspecies?) 
Varanus baritji
Varanus brevicauda
Varanus bushi
Varanus caudolineatus
Varanus eremius?
Varanus gilleni
Varanus glauerti
Varanus glebopalma
Varanus hamersleyensis?
Varanus kingorum
Varanus mitchelli
Varanus pilbarensis
Varanus primordius
Varanus scalaris
Varanus storri
Varanus tristis (all subspecies)
Varanus giganteus?
Varanus gouldii      
Varanus mertensi
Varanus panoptes (all subspecies)
Varanus rosenbergi?
Varanus spenceri
Varanus varius
Varanus gouldi (all subspecies)
  

 

 

 
 

 

About Mampam
Bye Bye Butaan

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Butaan start to visit fruiting trees before they are large enough to swallow the fruits. They make repeat journeys to trees, perhaps to reinforce memory of the position of the tree. If the youngster survives it may continue to use this tree for many decades. Fruiting trees like this are a vital resource for entire populations of butaan. Learn more >


 
Help Mampam
The Butaan Project
Monitoring Individuals 1

butaan1.jpgButaan are so shy they frequently remain in a tree for more than a week after being frightened. A large male we rescued from a trap hid in a tree for 22 days before coming down!* . Most lizards do not appear traumatised by being caught and released by scientists, and resume normal activity very quickly. But we think that butaan, especially older individuals, may permanently alter their activity areas after such an encounter. Because the animals are so shy, and highly vulnerable to human disturbance, we have had to develop a range of techniques that allow us to learn about them with the absolute minimum of interference.

 

 

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