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Mampam/Viper Press Library Print E-mail

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The Mampam/Viper Press library is a collection of documents, reports, books, multimedia guides and other publications relevant to these projects.The library is entirely free for use by bona fide researchers and students in Africa and Asia. Other users are asked to make a contribution for some documents. Passwords are available on application.

Bennett, D. 1995. A Little Book of Monitor Lizards. Viper Press, Aberdeen. PDF version of the limited colour edition. (this file is password protected, please contribute at least $5 for the password).

Bennett, D. 1999. Field Techniques Manual: Reptiles and Amphibians. EAC, Royal Geographical Society, London. (this file is password protected, please contribute at least $3 for the password).

All pdf files open in a new window, please adjust your browers to allow popups from this site.

Bennett, D. 1992. Varanus panoptes rubidus in Wanjarri, Western Australia. British Herp.Soc. Bull. 39.

Bennett,D. 1993.  A review of some literature concerning the rough-necked monitor lizard Varanus rudicollis. Reptilian 1 (9):7-10.

Bennett, D.  1993. Note on newly hatched Varanus tristis tristis in the Great Victoria Desert, Western Asutralia.. Brit. Herp. Soc. Bull. 44

Bennett, D. 1993. Australian monitors. Reptilia. 

Bennett, D. 1995. A Little Book of Monitor Lizards. Viper Press, Aberdeen. (PDF of limited colour edition. This file is password protected, please pay at least $10 for the password) [click here for password]

Bennett, D, and Lim Boo Liat. 1995. A note on the distribution of Varanus rudicollis and Varanus dumerilii in Peninsular Malaysia. Malay Nature Journal 49.

Bennett, D. 1999. Field Techniques: Reptiles and Amphibians.  EAC, Royal Geographical Society, London. (PDF. This file is password protected please pay at least $3 for the password). [click here for sample]

Bennett, D. (editor). 1999. Frogs of Coorg, Karnataka. Viper Press, Aberdeen.

Bennett, D. 2000. Preliminary data on the diet of Varanus exanthematicus in the coastal plain of Ghana. Herp. Journal 10.

Bennett, D. 2000 The abundance of Varanus exanthematicus in the coastal plain of Ghana

Bennett, D (editor). 2000  Wildlife of Polillo Island, Philippines. Viper Press, Aberdeen. 

Bennett, D. 2000. Observations of Bosc's monitor lizard (Varanus exathematicus) in the wild. Bull. Chicago Herp. Soc 25(8)

Bennett, D. N. Green and B. Basuglo. 2000. The abundance of Hippopotamus amphibius in the Black Volta River at Bui National Park. African Journal of Ecology 38

Bennett, D, 2001. A very misunderstood lizard: Varanus exanthematicus. Reptilia Magazine.

Bennett, D. 2001. Beautiful sounds from foul singers. Times Higher Educational Supplement. 

Bennett, D. 2002. Diet of juvenle Varanus niloticus on the Black Volta River. J. Herpetology 36(1)

Bennett, D and Ravi Thakoordyal. The Savannah Monitor the Truth about Varanus exanthematicus ($5- pdf file)

Choribe, P.  1997. Conservation status of Hippopotamus amphibius along the Black Volta River in northern Ghana. Thesis, UST Kumasi.

Cisse, M. Translations of works on Varanus exanthematicus in Senegal.

Green, N, Bennett, D and B Basuglo. 1998. Estimating the hippo population of Bui National Pa

Mertens, R. 1942. pages 244-272 

Mertens, R. 1942 skulls plates 20-34

Mertens, R. 1954. Uber die Rassen des Wustenwarens, Varanus griseus. Senck. Biol. 36 5/6:353-3

Retes, F. and D. Bennett. 2000. Multiple generations, multiple clutches and early maturity in four species of monitor lizards bred in captivity. Herp. Review 32

Varanus - Translations are available here

We also maintain a library at lizardskin.org 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

About Mampam
Bye Bye Butaan

 butaan1.jpg

Butaan start to visit fruiting trees before they are large enough to swallow the fruits. They make repeat journeys to trees, perhaps to reinforce memory of the position of the tree. If the youngster survives it may continue to use this tree for many decades. Fruiting trees like this are a vital resource for entire populations of butaan. Learn more >


 
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The Butaan Project
Videos from the Butaan Project
butanvideo1.jpgA small collection of videos made by the Butaan Project. It took us three years to get the first moving images of wild butaan. Some recordings are made using camcorders tied to trees and triggered by passive infrared monitors, others are made by volunteers from camouflaged hides.
Read more...
 

 

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