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Little Book of Monitor Lizards (1995) PDF Version
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Mampam/Viper Press Library
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  • Monitor Lizards  ( 1 items )
  • Butaan Project  ( 14 items )
  • African Monitors  ( 12 items )

    Five Facts about Savannah Monitors

    1. It is estimated that 90% of savannah montor lizards do not survive their first year of captivity.

    2. The USA is by far the biggest importer of savannah monitors

    3. Savannah monitor lizards are one of the commonest dumped/unwanted pets according to animal rescue centers

    4. It is estimated that less than 0.003% of the savannah monitors exported into the USA reproduced in captivity

    5. Savannah monitor lizards are all wild caught, either as babies, eggs or as gravid adult females


    Five Myths about Savannah Monitors

    1. Wild savannah monitors are highly opportunistic scavengers a bit like vultures

    2. Savannah monitors come from dry places

    3. Savannah monitors are undemanding in captivity

    4. Savannah monitors are hardy and easy to keep

    5. Savannah monitors are ideal for beginners
  • Bui Hippo Project  ( 17 items )
  • Polillo Project  ( 1 items )
  • Madagascar Bat Project  ( 1 items )
  • Frogs of Coorg  ( 2 items )
  • Western Visayas  ( 1 items )
  • Caspian Monitor Lizard  ( 1 items )


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Mampam Conservation


Practical Conservation for Neglected Species
We work with endangered and neglected people, wildlife and habitats, finding practical solutions to serious problems. 

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The Butaan Project
Monitoring Individuals 1

butaan1.jpgButaan are so shy they frequently remain in a tree for more than a week after being frightened. A large male we rescued from a trap hid in a tree for 22 days before coming down!* . Most lizards do not appear traumatised by being caught and released by scientists, and resume normal activity very quickly. But we think that butaan, especially older individuals, may permanently alter their activity areas after such an encounter. Because the animals are so shy, and highly vulnerable to human disturbance, we have had to develop a range of techniques that allow us to learn about them with the absolute minimum of interference.





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