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Varanus A-Z
Easy to browse Varanus A-Z

Varanus gouldii Print E-mail
Note: Update to taxonomy 2001: Internation Comission for Zoological Nomeclature ruled that the revised names mentioned here should be abandoned.

ImageAt present three subspecies are recognised; V.panoptes panoptes inhabits the extreme north of eastern Western Australia and the Northern Territory, the islands of the Torres Straits and probably many other islands...
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Varanus olivaceus Print E-mail
ImageThe extraordinary ability of monitor lizards to escape notice by ecologists and other field workers, despite their large size, is exemplified best by the case of Gray's monitor lizard. For 130 years, between 1845 and 1975, only a preserved juvenile and the skull of an adult were known.
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Varanus niloticus Print E-mail
ImageThe Nile monitor is the largest lizard in Africa and also one of the most widespread. It is known from all parts of Africa except desert regions (Mertens 1942, Luxmoore et al 1988). More than a hundred years ago Nile monitors were reported to live in Palestine (Tristram 1888).
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Varanus mitchelli Print E-mail
ImageMitchell's monitor is a small arboreal goanna found along the waterways of northern Western Australia and Northern Territory. Its long compressed tail led Mertens (1958) to place the species in the subgenus Varanus along with other large Australian goannas, but more recent studies suggest that this is a dwarf monitor of the Odatria subgenus...
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Varanus mertensi Print E-mail
ImageMertens' goanna is perhaps the most amphibious member of the monitor lizard family. It is found in northern Australia, from Western Australia east to western Queensland. According to Schmida (1985) they are common on waterways throughout northern Australia.
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About Mampam
William Oliver

William Oliver. Champion of biodiversity and its students. So many of us benefited from his advice and expertise. What a character. RIP.

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Help Mampam
The Butaan Project
Butaan Jump from Incredible Heights!
Butaan jump from incredible heights, land on the ground with a huge crash and walk away uninjured. Jumps to the ground from 30m were recorded by Auffenberg and our spool and line tracking suggests lizards regularly jump from heights of 4-15m when they are unmolested. The amazing jumping power of the butaan is undocumented in any other monitors lizard and may be one more unique aspects of the Putras Biawak group.
 

 

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