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Savannah Monitors
Video footage of Varanus exanthematicus in Ghana

Whilst recycling old video tapes for the butaan project I found this long-lost footage of Varanus exanthematicus in the wild.

 

 

Our pet-owners' guide to savannah monitor lizard is the first ever written by people who have studied the animals in the wild and bred them in captivity. There are at least seven books in print about the savannah monitor, but we think this is the only one worth reading! Last few available 

bokcoverall-200.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

U.K. Customers

- Click here if you are in UK

   Customers outside U.K.

- Click here if you are outside UK

To mark the export of half a million savannah monitors from Africa for the pet trade in the 21st century “The Truth about Varanus exanthematicus has been released as an ebook.  

- Click here to order Ebook

 

 

 

Read more...
 
Facts and Fiction about Savannah Monitor Lizards

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Five Facts about Savannah Monitors

1. It is estimated that 90% of savannah montor lizards do not survive their first year of captivity.

2. The USA is by far the biggest importer of savannah monitors

3. Savannah monitor lizards are one of the commonest dumped/unwanted lizard pets according to animal rescue centers

4. It is estimated that less than 0.003% of the savannah monitors exported into the USA reproduced in captivity

5. Savannah monitor lizards are all wild caught, either as babies, eggs or as gravid adult females

 

Five Myths about Savannah Monitors

1. Wild savannah monitors are highly opportunistic scavengers a bit like vultures

2. Savannah monitors come from dry places

3. Savannah monitors are undemanding in captivity

4. Savannah monitors are hardy and easy to keep

5. Savannah monitors are ideal for beginners

Learn more about savannah monitors here
 
Savannah Monitors

ImageSavannah monitor lizards are one of the most abused animals in the reptile pet trade. Toted as an easy to care for species it is actually a highly specialised animal that takes a long time to die in unsuitable conditions. Thousands are imported from Africa each year, almost none are bred in captivity and they are one of the most common lizard species encountered by animal rescue organisations. Demand for the animals has been fuelled by a series of books and articles that have completely ignored the animals' specialised ecology and given the wholly incorrect impression that the animals are "easy to keep", "ideal for beginners" "will eat almost anything" etc.  These publications are sold almost exclusively in pet shops simply to increase sales, and with utter disregard for the welfare of the animals.

 

 

 

 

 

Read more...
 
Welfare of Savannah Monitors

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Tens of thousands of savannah monitors are exported from West Africa every year for the pet trade, but what happens to them? Very few survive more than 5 years and the vast majority are dead within a year. Many of the survivors end up as unwanted pets. But the species is heavily promoted as an ideal choice of pet lizard for inexperienced keepers. 

Read more...
 
Savannah Monitors Lizards are Not Captive Bred

Image Juvenile savannah monitor lizards are needed in large numbers for the pet trade, who want them as cheaply as possible. They are collected as eggs dug up from nests or from recently caught gravid females, or dug from burrows at hatchlings. The pet trade calls animals collected as hatchlings "wild caught" and animals collected other ways "ranched, farmed" or "captive born". These terms are intended to mislead consumers into thinking the trade is more sustainable, whereas in fact it is more profitable and much more damaging to wild populations.

 

 

 

Read more...
 
Trade in Savannah Monitors
ImageCITES has kept records of international trade in savannah monitors since the mid 1970s. The USA by by far the largest consumer of pet savannah monitors, with gross imports totaling 642,500 animals up to 2010. In total, the UK, Germany, Canada, Japan, Spain, France, Taiwan and  Netherlands recorded gross imports of 145,711 up to 2010.
Read more...
 
Trade in Savannah Monitors - USA

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The USA  recorded gross imports of 20,759 live savannah monitors per year between 1979 and 2009.Between 1999 and 2009 the average was 30,402 lizards per year. The animals have a retail price of as little as $20

Read more...
 
The Truth about Varanus exanthematicus - now an ebook
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To mark the export of half a million savannah monitors from Africa for the pet trade in the 21st century “The Truth about Varanus exanthematicus has been released as an ebook for $5. Our pet-owners' guide to savannah monitor lizard is the first ever written by people who have studied the animals in the wild and bred them in captivity. There are seven books in print about the savannah monitor, but we think this is the only one worth reading!

 

Our pet-owners' guide to savannah monitor lizard is the first ever written by people who have studied the animals in the wild and bred them in captivity. There are at least seven books in print about the savannah monitor, but we think this is the only one worth reading! Last few available 

bokcoverall-200.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

U.K. Customers£21.95 including postage

 

   Customers outside U.K.£25.95 including postage

 

To mark the export of half a million savannah monitors from Africa for the pet trade in the 21st century “The Truth about Varanus exanthematicus has been released as an ebook.  Just £3 worldwide!

 

Read more...
 
Savannah Monitors Need to Dig

ImageTo promote the idea that savannah monitor lizards are easy to keep pet trade books recommend that the lizards should be kept on hard surfaces. But it is essential that they are provided with a deep substrate that they can dig into. You should not keep savannah monitor lizards on hard surfaces.

 

 

Read more...
 
Savannah Monitor Lizards are Not Scavengers

ImageTo make savannah monitor lizards appear easy to keep the pet trade promotes the idea that they are scavengers and will eat anything. In fact savannah monitors should be fed only whole animals in captivity. Dog food, meat and animal byproducts are not suitable foods for savannah monitors.

 

 

Read more...
 
Further Information about savannah monitor lizards

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Every year tens of thousands of people buy baby savannah monitors, so there is lots to read about them online. Here is a list of recommend sources and some of the worst ones to avoid.
Read more...
 
Savannah Monitors need Heat and Humidity

ImageTo promote the idea that savannah monitor lizards are easy to care for, the pet trade favours books that claim that savannah monitor lizards are from dry places and can be kept in a simple box enclosure with a water bowl. But in fact savannah monitor lizards require much higher levels of humidity that are best provided by a deep substrate that will hold moisture and allow the animals to dig.

 

 

Read more...
 
 

 

About Mampam
Bye Bye Butaan

 butaan1.jpg

Butaan start to visit fruiting trees before they are large enough to swallow the fruits. They make repeat journeys to trees, perhaps to reinforce memory of the position of the tree. If the youngster survives it may continue to use this tree for many decades. Fruiting trees like this are a vital resource for entire populations of butaan. Learn more >


 
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The Butaan Project
Monitoring Individuals 2
butaan4.jpgWe tape spool and line devices to butaan that have been caught and release them at the exact point of capture as soon as possible. Spool and line data gives us a detailed account of the animals' movementes for a few hours, days or weeks after release.  We have also used spool and line very effectively on other animals, including the endemic Polillo forest snail Helicostyla portei
 

 

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