Quick Links
Home Page
Site Map
Monitors
Search Mampam.com
       You are here: Home > Bui Hippo Project
Main Menu
Home
About Mampam
Viper Press
Advertise
Contact Us
Book Reviews
Varanus Species A-Z
Projects
Butaan Project
Savannah Monitors
Bui Hippo Project
Frogs of Coorg
Polillo Project
Madagascar Bats
Western Visayas
Turkmenistan
Library
Monitor Lizards
Glossop

 

Bui Hippo Project
Updates from Bui National Park Print E-mail

 Image

The Bui Lake is now about 25% full and the hippo population has not moved from the park; hippos in the lake area are occupying the shallow tributaries which are not yet inundated. The new lake has been providing extremely good fishing, but the old policy of letting fisherman catch and smoke fish in the southern part of the park has been discontinued.  The fishing community of Akanyakrom who previously  lived on the banks of the river, have been relocated to a site almost 4km from the river. Consequently fishermen must paddle to the Bole area to fish – fishermen claim this takes two hours. The new lake is very dangerous to navigate and four fishermen have drowned in recent months. 

Read more...
 
Bui National Park, Ghana Print E-mail

bui.gifAccording to many authoritative atlases and maps, Bui National Park is already underwater! But the dam first planned in the 1920s was not started until August 24th 2007. 

When Mampam Conservation were banned from working in Bui National Park, Ghana,  in 2001, it marked the end of independent biological reseach in the area. Now work has begun on a controversial hydroelectric dam that will destroy the riverine habitat of the park and, we believe, lead to the local extinction of many animal species including the hippopotamus.The destruction of Bui National Park has gone almost unremarked. This site aims to provide a record of Bui National Park  prior to its innundation




Read more...
 
How many hippos live in Bui National Park? Print E-mail

ImageSurveys conducted since 1990 suggested that the hippo population in Bui National Park was increasing. However the survey commissioned for the Bui Hydroelectric Project suggests that only 200 animals exist in the park, about half the number that was suggested by previous studies.

Read more...
 
Bui Project - Comments on EIA Print E-mail
ImageAn Environmental Impact Assessment for the Bui Dam Project was prepared by Environmental Resources Management in association with SGS Environment. Many of its claims are impossible to verify because the government of Ghana prohibited independent biological research in Bui National Park in 2001. A number of the claims made in the assessment are surprising. One of the most extraordinary claims in the assessment is that "hippopotamus will benefit from the increased area of littoral habitat provided by the reservoir".
Read more...
 
Bui Dam Project Print E-mail
ImageIn March 2001 the government of Ghana banned my research in Bui National Park. The area is due to be flooded by a hydroelectric dam in 2002. Other than the late Paul Choribe, my teams and I are the only scientists to have conducted biological research at Bui in all 29 years of the park's existence.
Read more...
 
What will happen to the Bui Hippos? Print E-mail
ImageHippos have survived at Bui because they do not have to compete with people and livestock. When the dam is constructed all their current foraging areas will be flooded and the animals will be forced to move upstream to find food. This will bring them into direct conflict with people because riverine areas outside the park are farmed by people and heavily grazed by domestic animals. The impact of 400 (or 200, according to the most recent surveys commissioned by the Ghanian government) hippos moving into areas inhabited by humans is not difficult to imagine.
 
The Black Volta Project Print E-mail
ImageBetween May and August 1997 a team of 41 people carried out construction work and surveys of animals in Bui National Park, Ghana. The Park has been protected since 1971 but no previous work on the diversity of the area had been carried out. The area is under threat from a hydroelectric project that will destroy all riverine habitats within the protected area. Click here for the Bui Hippo Project
Read more...
 
The Wechaiu Hippo Scandal Print E-mail
ImageThe Wechiau Hippo Sanctuary: Separating the Fact from the Fantasy
Daniel Bennett, April 2001

The Nature Conservation Research Council of Ghana claims that the Bui hippos could survive around Weichau, where about 50 hippos still exist along about 40km of the Black Volta. However they decline to produce any evidence to support this claim, which I believe to be extremely doubtful and unsupported by any scientific evidence. It is hard to imagine that any trained biologist could make such outrageous claims. When I asked for confirmation that NCRC had conducted any research on hippos in Ghana they threatened me with legal action!


Read more...
 
Fish of Bui National Park Print E-mail

Image

The Fish of Bui National Park, Ghana

 

Read more...
 
Recent News about Bui Print E-mail

 Download the Bui Environmental Impact Assessment here >

 Download the Bui Environmental Impact Assessment Appendices here >

 Reuters featured article on the Bui Crisis here

"A leading conservationist in Ghana, John Mason, has argued that the hippos are the “least threatened species at Bui,” saying that they will likely migrate away on their own once construction begins." source here

$25 Million for "Bui City" here  

Calgary Zoo website supports the idea that the Bui hippos may migrate to Weichau and stay there. source here

Down to Earth Magazine November 2007 here  

 

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 10 of 17
 

 

About Mampam
Mampam Conservation

peter-200.jpg

Practical Conservation for Neglected Species
We work with endangered and neglected people, wildlife and habitats, finding practical solutions to serious problems. 

 
Help Mampam

Please help us in our conservation efforts by making a small donation to us through PayPal... every little bit helps!

 

 
The Butaan Project
Butaan are Obligate Frugivores!
An obligate frugivore is an animal whose diet throughout its range consist largely of fruit. Other obligate frugivores in the Philippines include flying foxes, hornbills and other birds. The butaan is much larger than any other obligate frugivore in the Philippines and had a much more restricted diet; on Polillo the diet of adult butaan consists almost entirely of eight species of fruits and two species of snails.

 

 

© 2014 Mampam Conservation