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Magazine Articles
Dumeril's Monitor Print E-mail
ImageDumeril's monitor is a large lizard from southeast Asia about which very little is known. Until a few years ago they were not uncommon in the pet trade in Europe and the U.S.A. but breeding success with the species was very limited and today they rarely appear on dealers' lists.
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Caspian Monitor Print E-mail
ImageVaranus griseus is perhaps the most widespread extant monitor lizard. It is found from northwestern Africa through all deserts as far as western India. Within this range three subspecies are recognised; V. griseus griseus from Africa the Middle East and Iraq, V.griseus koniecznyi from eastern Afghanistan through Pakistan to India and V.griseus caspius from eastern Iran, western Afghanistan and the adjacent part of the U.S.S.R.
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Water Monitor Print E-mail
The first two articles in this occasional series on the monitor lizards of Asia discussed two rare and enigmatic animals found only in rainforests and mangrove swamps. Virtually nothing is known of their biology and they are only rarely seen in captivity, at least on this side of the Atlantic (Bennett 1993, 1995).
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New Species... Print E-mail
In my Little Book of Monitor Lizards, published in 1995 I suggested that "the monitor lizards of Indonesia are a taxonomist's paradise, providing they do not get seasick". Since then four new species have been described from the region...
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About Mampam
William Oliver

William Oliver. Champion of biodiversity and its students. So many of us benefited from his advice and expertise. What a character. RIP.

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Help Mampam
The Butaan Project
The Butaan Project - Conservation

polillomap1.jpgThe dark green patch at center left in this unmanipulated Google Earth image is the last remaining fragment of unlogged lowland dipterocarp forest on Polillo Island, and our main study site for the last 11 years. Less than one square mile in size (220ha) and less than 100m above sea level, the Sibulan Watershed Reserve has lost much of its secondary boundary forest over the last six years through illegal and uncontrolled agricultural activities. 

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