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Mampam Conservation

Practical Conservation for Neglected Species

love-us-love-our-mampam2.jpgWe work with endangered and neglected people, wildlife and habitats, finding practical solutions to serious problems. Our projects are selected according to their conservation priority, potential for community-based action and lack of charisma. There are no pandas or elephants here! We concentrate on unpopular creatures living in places where life is difficult for everyone and conservation can never become an issue until peoples' basic rights and requirements are fulfilled. Winning many prestigious conservation awards and gaining a reputation for dedication, perseverance and a dogged determination to speak the truth, Mampam Conservation philosophy can be summarized simply: "If we don't do it, nobody else will!"

 

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William Oliver

William Oliver. Champion of biodiversity and its students. So many of us benefited from his advice and expertise. What a character. RIP.

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Savannah Monitor Book

 

Our pet-owners' guide to savannah monitor lizard is the first ever written by people who have studied the animals in the wild and bred them in captivity. There are at least seven books in print about the savannah monitor, but we think this is the only one worth reading! Last few available 

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Worldwide orders available

 

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Sustainability guide to monitor lizards in wildlife trade

To assist anybody who cares, monitor lizards are ranked according to sustainability in the pet trade.

greenhalf.jpg The green species are widely available from captive bred sources; if you keep pairs of these animals you have a good chance of breeding them if you treat them right, and if you just want a pet you have the satisfaction of knowing that they have not been taken from the wild.

 

 
yellow100.jpg  The yellow species are almost always taken from the wild. They are very occasionally bred in captivity and captive bred stock is very difficult to find. These species inhabit very large areas and there are no reasons to suppose that the wildlife trade is having a detrimental impact on their global populations because 1) numbers harvested for wildlife trade are relatively small or 2) because populations are known to be large and robust. African and Asian species tend also to be harvested for meat or leather, in much larger numbers than are taken for the pet trade. Buying these species will not have any significant effect on wild populations.

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Updates from Bui National Park

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The Bui Lake is now about 25% full and the hippo population has not moved from the park; hippos in the lake area are occupying the shallow tributaries which are not yet inundated. The new lake has been providing extremely good fishing, but the old policy of letting fisherman catch and smoke fish in the southern part of the park has been discontinued.  The fishing community of Akanyakrom who previously  lived on the banks of the river, have been relocated to a site almost 4km from the river. Consequently fishermen must paddle to the Bole area to fish – fishermen claim this takes two hours. The new lake is very dangerous to navigate and four fishermen have drowned in recent months. 

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Polillo Butaan Project Final Report 1999-2010

Download Polillo Butaan Project Final Report 1999-2010(2MB)
Download Appendix II and III (2MB)
Download entire document (4MB)

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Monitor Lizards by Mampam Conservation

Monitor lizards (Varanus species) include the largest lizards in the world and are of considerable ecomonic value in some of the poorest countries in the world. There are many unresolved and serious conservation and welfare issues connected with the trade in monitor lizards.

 

Click here for the Monitor Lizard site 

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An Introduction to the Bats of Glossop

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Bats of Madagascar

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Conducting bat surveys isn't easy and the bats of Madagascar are the least known mammals in Madagascar. Bats hate scientists and are very good at avoiding them. Identifying the bats has often required microscopic examinations of skull morphology and other characteristics. So first you had to catch the bat, and then you had to kill it. No wonder nobody wanted to study them!  We've tried to change this by producing a fieldguide that will allow identification of free flying Malagasy bats with an ultrasound detector. 

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The Butaan Project

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Since 1999 the Butaan Project has been studying the rare, endangered, and unique fruit-eating monitor lizards of the Philippines.  Butaan is just one of several races of frugivorous monitor lizards in the Philippines ("Pandan Biawak"), all of which are of at least as great a conservation concern as the Komodo dragon, but receive virtually none of the attention. Pandan Biawak occur only in lowland dipterocarp forest. The first species (Butaan) was discovered in 1845 and not seen alive by a scientist until the late 1970s. The next species (Mabitang) was discovered in 2001. Other species remain undescribed, and some may have gone extinct without ever having been recognised.

 

 

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Varanus bitatawa

Varanus bitatawa is the third species of  monitor lizard to be recognised by science that belongs to the "Pandan Biawak" group,  all of which are of at least as great a conservation concern as the Komodo dragon, but receive virtually none of the attention. Pandan Biawak occur only in lowland dipterocarp forest. The first species (Varanus olivaceus or Butaan) was discovered in 1845 and not seen alive by a scientist until the late 1970s. The next species (Varanus mabitang or Mabitang) was discovered in 2001 and in 2010 Varanus bitatawa (Butikaw or Bitatawa) was described. Other species of frugivorous monitor lizards may remain undescribed, but many may have  gone extinct without ever having been recognised.

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Bui National Park, Ghana

bui.gifAccording to many authoritative atlases and maps, Bui National Park is already underwater! But the dam first planned in the 1920s was not started until August 24th 2007. 

When Mampam Conservation were banned from working in Bui National Park, Ghana,  in 2001, it marked the end of independent biological reseach in the area. Now work has begun on a controversial hydroelectric dam that will destroy the riverine habitat of the park and, we believe, lead to the local extinction of many animal species including the hippopotamus.The destruction of Bui National Park has gone almost unremarked. This site aims to provide a record of Bui National Park  prior to its innundation




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Little Book of Monitor Lizards (1995) PDF Version
LBML-yellow.jpgFirst published in 1995 by Viper Press (the publishing arm of Mampam Conservation), Daniel Bennett's "Little Book of Monitor Lizards" survived subsequent editions in German and an edited English edition, all now out of print. A pdf version of the first edition is now available for only $5, the funds will be used directly for monitor lizard research. 220 pages, first published in November 1995, ISBN-10: 095266321X, ISBN-13: 978-0952663218
 


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News from Mampam Conservation

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The mampam website has been running for 16 years and aims to provide full details of projects at no charge. All out of print books and multimedia guides are provided here and full image archives are being developed for each project. This will complete the website's mission.

 

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Frogs of Coorg
  The Western Ghats are a chain of mountains running from Bombay to the southern tip of India. They are home to some of the most diverse frog communities on Earth. Over 90% of the species there are found nowhere else, and there is evidence that individual hilltops harbour unique species. We produced a multimedia guide to the amphibians of Coorg that includes advertisment calls and details of larval stages. Visit the Frogs of Coorg Website!>
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Mampam/Viper Press Library

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The Mampam/Viper Press library is a collection of documents, reports, books, multimedia guides and other publications relevant to these projects.The library is entirely free for use by bona fide researchers and students in Africa and Asia. Other users are asked to make a contribution for some documents. Passwords are available on application.

Bennett, D. 1995. A Little Book of Monitor Lizards. Viper Press, Aberdeen. PDF version of the limited colour edition. (this file is password protected, please contribute at least $5 for the password).

Bennett, D. 1999. Field Techniques Manual: Reptiles and Amphibians. EAC, Royal Geographical Society, London. (this file is password protected, please contribute at least $3 for the password).

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Bat Surveys - UK
With 16 years experience of conducting high quality bat surveys worldwide, Mampam Conservation now offers bat surveys to UK specifications for planning purposes in Great Britain. Based in Glossop, we conduct bat surveys to extremely high standards and are fully licenced by Natural England and Scottish Natural Heritage. This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Save Your Monitor Lizards!

Save Your Monitors!
Monitor lizards are heavily exploited for their meat and leather and for the international wildlife trade. There have been very few investigations into the ecology and conservation status of monitor lizards, and, as far as I am aware, no funds from the trade in monitor lizards has ever been used to fund  research.


This project aims to improve this situation in the following way.
1.     People who keep monitor lizards donate their dead animals to a national Save Your Monitors  group.
2.     Members of the national group make products from the dead monitor lizards (e.g. leather goods, skeletal preparations) and sell them on ebay
3.     The profits generated are distributed as small grants to students in countries where monitor lizards live, allowing them to make basic investigations into local monitor lizard populations.

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About Mampam
News from Mampam Conservation

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The mampam website has been running for 16 years and aims to provide full details of projects at no charge. All out of print books and multimedia guides are provided here and full image archives are being developed for each project. This will complete the website's mission.

 

 
Help Mampam

Please help us in our conservation efforts by making a small donation to us through PayPal... every little bit helps!

 

 
The Butaan Project
Monitoring Individuals 3
The best way to monitor individual butaan would be to extract DNA from fresh feces found on the forest floor. We can find the feces but we cannot afford the analysis!
 

 

© 2014 Mampam Conservation